Monthly Archives: August 2017

Oh, The Places I’ll Go


Twenty years old and feeling like a teen in a country-mandated “adult’s” body. I’m Anitta, an Indian American English major (weird combo, I agree), and I just have no clue. I’m sure I’m not the only one.

Finding out that I got into the Temple University Study Abroad program in Japan was not the end of my process. There were plenty of forms to submit and manuals to read afterwards. Most of them were simple enough. Submitting the housing deposit was not difficult to figure out. Clicking “finished reading” on the various “must read” forms on the application website was satisfying. I felt like I was accomplishing so much with each checkmark. But it’s a deception. Boxes like “Japan’s COE” came with so many forms to fill out and so much information to gather. There were plenty of deadlines to keep track of, like when course requests were due (a date that almost snuck past me). The program emphasizes the need for a person to do this on their own in order to exercise independence. I do not disagree with this thought. As a child of two immigrants from rural South India, I have plenty of experience wrestling with numbers and struggling to wrangle signatures for the FAFSA and CSS profile on my own. But doing the Study Abroad forms on my own allowed the reality that I would be on my own in a foreign country, where I don’t know the language, sink in. And that was scary.

People would ask me about my fall semester and I would tell them about Tokyo. Their faces would light up and the inevitable question: “Are you excited?” I knew what they wanted to hear: “Of course I am!” What they did not know was that deep inside the fear was overtaking the excitement. I know what I will do: study up on Japanese culture; learn as much conversational Japanese as possible over the summer; and make sure I know all the characters related to transportation, airports, directions, and money. The steps I will take to minimize the fear will help but the fear will not completely disappear. I know this because this is what happened before I left for a college that was located 12 hours away by car. I believe it is fine to let the fear be your primary emotion. I am going to a whole other country; why should I not be scared? It doesn’t make me any less excited; I may be scared now but a month into the program and my feelings will probably change. Maybe I won’t find friends instantly, but I’m sure there’s someone in Tokyo; and if not, that’s fine because I have friends back home. Maybe I don’t know the language that well. A month in, I’m sure I’ll be able to make do because I am not the only person who has gone to a foreign country without a good grasp of the language. Others have done fine and so will I. Maybe I’ll get lost. Well, that’s not so different than when I’m back home, so that just means it’s time to whip out the phone like I always do. Change will always be scary for me. Nevertheless, I will never stop taking the next step because where I am right now is not where I want to stop.


Packed and almost ready to go!


Mad Dash to the Finish Line


Lawson runs, catching the next express train, stepping outside my dorm room into a kitchen full of friends- words cannot describe how much I will truly miss everything this program and country have given me these past few months. Especially the everyday scenes in Tokyo, like people riding their bikes to and from train stations, or the wildly various fashion styles found throughout the city. I am going to miss having a stunning view of bustling Shibuya and quiet residential neighbourhoods in Azabu on my daily commute. But most of all, I am going to miss all the people I have met on this trip. From my wonderful professor (Mr. Ian Lynam), to all the friends I made in my classes, and of course everyone who lived at the dorms with me, the people I have met have made as much an impact on me as my studies and travels here.

Three friends seen riding on their bike while on my way to the station.

Views of Tokyo from a building near my internship office in Ebisu.

A crepe I bought on Takeshita Street during my weekly visit to Harajuku.

People lining up for the next train at Shibuya Station.

My friend, Kazuki, a native of Japan, on our lunch together!

Views of Odaiba from the train.

One of the many local festivals that happen throughout Tokyo. This one was right outside the station I get off at for my internship!


This past week was the official last week for the study abroad program. Personally, I was busy until the very last minute with school, my internship, and trying to squeeze in as much time with everyone! It was really weird making plans with people and coming to the realization that it would be the last time (at least for a while) until we would see each other again. It was a strange mix of feeling excited to hang out in Tokyo, and reminiscent because it was the end.

Matt, Seamus, Colin, Ariel, and I at our last “family dinner” together. [Photo Credit: The Waitress]

A very colorful room of interactive art at the Sky Circus in Ikebukuro.

Ariel in her favorite room at Sky Circus.

Ariel and I enjoying a light display inside a room covered in mirrors.

Hinako, Ruchi, Kelsang (birthday girl!), myself, and Hina! [Photo Credit: Rob Weiss]

Greg giving his speech surrounded by Erik, Kevin, and Shaani.

Phil, Shaani, Kevin, and myself!

The whole family together at the end! [Photo Credit: Super nice locals!]

As luxurious as this trip was, it was not an easy one, but it was most definitely worth every penny and struggle it took to get here. I am truly grateful for Temple University for allowing me this opportunity. They say study abroad is a once in a life time experience, and I am here to reassure you that statement rings true.

Final Thoughts on Final Days, Live from Narita Airport


Today at around noon in Tokyo, Japan, I took the last final exam of my foreseeable college career. It was a bit strange getting sentimental as I wrote about American international relations in East Asia, but I did nonetheless. This week has been full of paper-writing and test-taking, but I’ve still been keenly aware of the little time I have left to be with my friends and TUJ peers – and be in this program in general. So, in between studying, I’ve crammed outings for sightseeing and quality time, including trips to war museums by Yasukuni Shrine, Ueno markets, and a long-awaited return trip to Ikebukuro’s Sky Circus.


Next to this koi pond at Yasukuni Shrine was a vending machine selling boxes of fish food for ¥100 apiece. I happily took part.

For those who have been following along, I’ve been meaning to come back to Ikebukuro ever since my last visit to Sky Circus. The first time, I took advantage of almost all the interactive observatory had to offer, excluding one thing: a window with a transcription reading, “Let’s meet here at night, because something happens in this window.” I finally made the trip back, but not until my very last night in Tokyo, planned last-minute. The mystery window turned out to be a compatibility tester, which two of our friends tried out in good nature. It was then that we realized that Sky Circus is a popular location for young couples on dates. It was an interesting little observation on local life that wouldn’t have been possible with a little context and a second look.


Matt and Seamus, to their delight, find their compatibility rating to be 99%.


A shot of Richel in my favorite room in Sky Circus: one made completely of mirrors that shifts scenes of different seasons.


Friends feeling sentimental on their last night together in Ikebukuro. (Credit: Seamus Kirby)

Today also marks my last day as a Temple student in the Kanagawa dorms. With two close friends I’ve made on this trip, fellow students Richel and Seamus, I have a trip to Osaka, Kyoto and Gifu planned. Directly after my last final, I headed to a bridge and park area off the stop before Musashi-Kosugi, called Shin-Maruko. Each day to and from class, I’ve watched this bridge go by. Much like with my return to Sky Circus, I’ve been telling myself I’d visit, but had no concrete plans. A last-minute, final group get-together – almost the entire Summer Study Abroad group living at the dorms – is what eventually got me there. As TUJ student Greg said in a small speech, this trip has brought together people from very different places and very different backgrounds – and very fast. For a group of people who I’ve only known for two months, saying goodbye was heartbreaking. We, unfortunately, had to rush to the dorms to move out and make it to the airport. In the end, we may have lingered just a bit too long trying to delay our sad farewells, and missed our 8:25 PM flight. Terminal 3 of Narita Airport is where I sit now, awaiting the next soonest at 9:45 AM. Of anywhere, however, I’m glad that it’s this incredible city of Tokyo that I’ve become stranded in.

What’s next, after Japan? I return home, hopefully soon to find a place and career back in New York. I’m still not entirely sure what that entails. If my time in Tokyo has shown me anything, it’s that it is okay observing and discovering as you go. This city is fluid, containing both traditional and modern, peace and robustness. Appreciating and applying this is its own precious skill I feel I’ve acquired, thanks to my time with this wonderful city, my wonderful friends, and TUJ.