L is for Lawson, Loppi and Love

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If there’s one store that all TUJ students (whether they are under Japanese Admission or Study Abroad) know about, it’s Lawson. There’s one right next to the Azabu main building and it’s where they can go to get a quick bite to eat, catch up on some quality reading from a selection of magazines and pay their bills. (Say whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat?) Yes, in Japan, you can pay your bills at the convenience store and this alone takes the word “convenience” to a new level. But I digress. It was Lawson that made me the happiest person this week. Just how did this little conbini make me the happiest person in the world in one day? Loppi, (ロッピー) that’s how.

But you may be wondering, “What the heck is Loppi?” Loppi is magic, that’s what it is. It’s a machine that you can find at any Lawson. Although it looks like an ATM machine it’s used to buy tickets to events (for concerts, sports, museum exhibitions, etc.) Thanks to Loppi, it was possible for me to buy a concert ticket to see Miyavi, one of the first Japanese artists I listened to that paved the way for my love of all Japanese music. It’s extremely convenient for those like me who are terrified of calling a Japanese venue for ticket information or going through complicated online registration in only Japanese in order to purchase a ticket online. Loppi was a lifesaver and a time-saver for me. Even though there isn’t an option for English, Loppi is fairly easy to operate for those with limited Japanese. But before I proceed, allow me to clarify one thing. The Loppi machine does not print out the actual tickets themselves. It allows you to pay for the ticket and receive it at Lawson. With that, here’s the step-by-step breakdown for what I had to do to get my concert ticket:

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After touching anywhere on the screen, you will see this screen. Touch the option on the left to search for your event via L-code or name of the event.

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Input the L-code for the event. This is a five digit number that is often available when you search for an event on Lawson’s website. I had an L-code for the concert so I found it to be a lot easier in terms of getting to it quicker. Touch the orange button that will appear on the lower right. However, if you don’t have an L-code, just search for the event by name, venue or artist. You will be taken to a page where you will be given options and must select which event and on what day you would like to attend.

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There it is. My desired concert. Artist, venue, date, time all correct. Now to select my preferred seating. 1st Floor please.

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Select how many tickets you want to purchase using the arrow buttons and the price at the bottom right will adjust itself. Some can only go up to a 4 ticket maximum while others have the option for up to 10. But seeing as how there’s only one of me, I think I can be satisfied with just one. Then press the orange button. If an error message pops up, that means the particular show/seat you selected is sold out or not available. If you need to go back, simply touch the back arrow on the top left corner of the screen.

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This page is just to accept the store’s minimal fee for using their Loppi machine. It’s literally a dollar so no harm in it. Press the orange button again.

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This is for those who have a Lawson card. Didn’t waste my time on this one. I didn’t have one so I selected the option that said いいえ (or no).

Enter your name (in hiragana) in first bar (doesn't matter if it's last name, first name or first name, last name). Make sure you hit the

Enter your name (in hiragana) in first bar (doesn’t matter if it’s last name, first name or first name, last name). Make sure you hit the button that says ー字あけるbetween your first and last name otherwise an error will pop up. You will see the katakana appear below the hiragana just to be sure that it is right. When you’re done, press the orange button that will appear on the lower right.

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Enter your phone number. I have a Japanese cellphone so I put in my number. You can also use the Japanese phone number of a friend. When you’re finished, press the orange button that will appear on the lower right.

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Time to confirm the order one last time. Artist, venue, event, date, time, number of tickets, seating all correct, but what is this? My full name isn’t there. I was missing a character in my last name.

As you can see, I had some trouble when the confirmation screen came up. I didn’t see my full name so I ended up going back several times and retyping it only to get the same result. It wasn’t until I asked one of the employees that I felt like a fool. It seemed that my full name would never come up on the screen because……wait for it……it was too long. (Gasp!) Luckily, the employee assured me that it was fine and I finished placing my ticket order.

Note: A final message will pop up after you push the orange button on the confirmation screen. It will ask if you understand that you cannot cancel the ticket once it has been purchased. Touch the button on the right, which says “はい”

Yes, print me out that lovely receipt so I can be one step closer.

Yes, print me out that lovely receipt so I can be one step closer.

Little receipt, you are what is going to help me see Miyavi live for the first time!

Little receipt, you are what is going to help me see Miyavi live for the first time!

After the receipt printed out, I had to take it to the front counter. They scanned the receipt and had me confirm the event, location, date and time. All was correct so I wrote my name on the receipt in katakana to make it official, (last name then first name of course.) The cashier took the receipt back and I paid for the ticket (cash or credit was fine.) At that point, all that stood between me and my concert ticket was an mere 60 seconds. (Yes, I said it, 60 seconds!) The cashier handed me my ticket and I’m pretty sure I heard a choir behind me.

やった!私のコンサートチケットを買った!私はMiyaviを見に行こう!

やった!私のコンサートチケットを買った!私はMiyaviを見に行こう!(Alright! I bought my concert ticket. I’m going to see Miyavi!)

In my hands was my ticket. My glorious ticket. The ticket that would allow me to see one of the artists I thought I would never in my life get to see. That evening, I went home with a smile on my face and a happy bounce in my step.

Study abroad student, Vivienne Shao, was able to get a ticket to the Ghibli Museum in Mitaka thanks to Loppi.

Study abroad student, Vivienne Shao, was able to get a ticket to the Ghibli Museum in Mitaka thanks to Loppi 🙂

Now you may be asking, “So where’s the love part of this?” Perhaps you’re wondering, “Did you find love at Lawson? Did you find some tall, handsome Japanese man capable of prolonging your stay in Japan?” Well, you’re only half right. I did find love but it wasn’t with a Japanese man. It was with a Japanese machine. (Woah, what?) Before you start panicking, let me clarify:

I Love Loppi!

That wasn’t too lame, right?

私は気にしないから、もう一回いう (I don’t care so I’ll say it one more time):

ロッピーが大好きです!

(I LOVE LOPPI!)

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