Love Locks, Parks and Monuments

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During the weekdays that I spent in Busan, South Korea, I had time to myself until around 5 or so, when my friend Alex would get out of work. We’d come up with a train station exit to meet at, and before then, I would be free to roam Busan at my own leisure. Equipped with a map marked with circles and notes, I spent one of my days exploring the Nampo area.

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The Lotte Department Store has a scenic viewpoint of the city. This is the view facing towards the city, and looking towards Busan Tower, a watchtower that I made my trek to later in the day. IMG_8916

There are fences at these overviews where couples leave locks to symbolize their love. Often the locks have names, dates and hearts scrawled on them.

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Bike lock heart – so cute!

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View from the top of the Lotte Department Store, facing the sea.

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There was also a “zoo” at the top of this department store. There were some pigs and bunnies.

It seemed wrong not to fill you in on that.

After this scouting, I headed towards Busan Tower. IMG_9122

Busan citizens’ bell pavilion

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Flower clock

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(L) statue of General Lee Sunsin (R) Cheongdongyongtap, a statue of a bronze dragon.

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Busan Tower is pictured above. The ornate building also pictured houses a museum of musical instruments.IMG_9175

View from Busan Tower overlooking the citizens’ bell pavilion, flower clock, and statue of General Lee Sunsin

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View from Busan Tower looking towards the harbor

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Men playing a game outside of Busan Tower. There were lots of old men playing this game in Yongdusan Park, where the tower is located.

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There were also more love locks attached to fences and benches surrounding Busan Tower.

The picture above is a photo shout out to my sister and brother – 2/26 is our birthday. I love and miss them and was thinking of them when I took this.

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After seeing the sights in Yongdusan Park, I took a trip farther north. I hopped in a cab, pointed at a spot on my map that read “Jung-ang Park,” and found myself on a scenic journey up some mountains. I hadn’t been in a car since my arrival to Japan in January, which was an odd realization for me to have.

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Jung-ang (or Daecheong) Park turned out to be the location of the Monument to the Loyal Dead, a memorial to those that fought and died in the Korean War.

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View from the top of Mount Daecheong

Just a few minutes away from this site is Minju Park Busan, also called Democracy Park.

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There are many sculptures and monuments located at Democracy Park.

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About Christine Boegemann

A recent graduate with a BA from Temple University's Film and Media Arts Program, Christine Boegemann has spent her undergrad years working to foster creative growth everywhere she could find it – in herself and others. Her list of college activities include working in working at Temple's film lab, acting as VP for a student organization that produces its own short films and film festivals, and serving as head of art department for a sketch show called Temple Smash. She has interned at two VFX houses - one in Manhattan, New York and the other in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She also studied abroad in India in the summer of 2012 as a member of the 2012 cohort of the Vira I. Heinz (VIH) Program for Women in Global Leadership. She spent spring 2013, her final semester, studying art and animation in Tokyo, Japan. During her time there, she worked as a photo blogger for Temple Study Abroad. She also worked as a conversation host at an English café in Shibuya. Now back in the US, Christine is currently working as a producer for the feature film, The Youth Washed Up. She is also continuing work on her own independent project rooted in sharing the work and experiences of women she met during her time in India.

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